LINKS and signs of Anorexia and Bulimia - KTIV News 4 Sioux City IA: News, Weather and Sports

LINKS and signs of Anorexia and Bulimia

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Women's Health

ANAD/National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders

Mercy Business Health Services EAP

712-274-4300 Ask to speak with Jessica

Boys and Girls Home/Outpatient Services - Contact Edith (712) 293-4733

Jackson Recovery/Outpatients Services


River Hills Recovery Center

3320 West 4th Street

Sioux City, IA

(712) 202-0777

Children's Hospital & Medical Center - Omaha

Information from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Women's Health:

What are signs of anorexia?

Someone with anorexia may look very thin. She or he may use extreme measures to lose weight by:

Making her or himself throw up

Taking pills to urinate or have a bowel movement

Taking diet pills

Not eating or eating very little

Exercising a lot, even in bad weather or when hurt or tired

Weighing food and counting calories

Eating very small amounts of only certain foods

Moving food around the plate instead of eating it

Someone with anorexia may also have a distorted body image, shown by thinking she or he is fat, wearing baggy clothes, weighing her or himself many times a day, and fearing weight gain.

Anorexia can also cause someone to not act like her or himself. She or he may talk about weight and food all the time, not eat in front of others, be moody or sad, or not want to go out with friends. People with anorexia may also have other psychiatric and physical illnesses, including:

Depression

Anxiety

Obsessive behavior

Substance abuse

Issues with the heart and/or brain

Problems with physical development

What causes bulimia?

Bulimia is more than just a problem with food. A binge can be triggered by dieting, stress, or uncomfortable emotions, such as anger or sadness. Purging and other actions to prevent weight gain are ways for people with bulimia to feel more in control of their lives and ease stress and anxiety. There is no single known cause of bulimia, but there are some factors that may play a part.

Culture. Women in the U.S. are under constant pressure to fit a certain ideal of beauty. Seeing images of flawless, thin females everywhere makes it hard for women to feel good about their bodies.

Families. If you have a mother or sister with bulimia, you are more likely to also have bulimia. Parents who think looks are important, diet themselves, or criticize their children's bodies are more likely to have a child with bulimia.

Life changes or stressful events. Traumatic events (like rape), as well as stressful things (like starting a new job), can lead to bulimia.

Personality traits. A person with bulimia may not like herself, hate the way she looks, or feel hopeless. She may be very moody, have problems expressing anger, or have a hard time controlling impulsive behaviors.

Biology. Genes, hormones, and chemicals in the brain may be factors in developing bulimia.

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What are signs of bulimia?

A person with bulimia may be thin, overweight, or have a normal weight. Also, bulimic behavior, such as throwing up, is often done in private because the person with bulimia feels shame or disgust. This makes it hard to know if someone has bulimia. But there are warning signs to look out for. Someone with bulimia may use extreme measures to lose weight by:

Using diet pills, or taking pills to urinate or have a bowel movement

Going to the bathroom all the time after eating (to throw up)

Exercising a lot, even in bad weather or when hurt or tired

Someone with bulimia may show signs of throwing up, such as:

Swollen cheeks or jaw area

Calluses or scrapes on the knuckles (if using fingers to induce vomiting)

Teeth that look clear

Broken blood vessels in the eyes

People with bulimia often have other mental health conditions, including:

Depression

Anxiety

Substance abuse problems

Someone with bulimia may also have a distorted body image, shown by thinking she or he is fat, hating her or his body, and fearing weight gain.

Bulimia can also cause someone to not act like her or himself. She or he may be moody or sad, or may not want to go out with friends.



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