KTIV continues to work to get our signal back on air - KTIV News 4 Sioux City IA: News, Weather and Sports

KTIV continues to work to get our signal back on air

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Picture of KTIV's Tower on Sunday November 8. Picture of KTIV's Tower on Sunday November 8.
KTIV's TV tower near Hinton, Iowa. KTIV's TV tower near Hinton, Iowa.
KTIV's antenna where the crews are working to repair the issue. KTIV's antenna where the crews are working to repair the issue.
A crew member getting ready to climb up the tower to access the situation. A crew member getting ready to climb up the tower to access the situation.

"We're working so hard, because we want to be there to be of service to those customers. We know their programming is important, that information is vital, and we want to make sure we do everything we can to restore that to them," Bridget Breen, KTIV Station Manager said.

KTIV is currently experiencing issues with its 2,000 foot tall transmission tower, located north of Hinton, Iowa.

Those issues are preventing many of you from receiving a signal.

KTIV's transmission line inside the broadcasting tower had a malfunction called a 'burnout,' which has affected our ability to broadcast our signal.

CableOne customers in Sioux City and Norfolk will have no change to their signal. However, anyone using another provider or an antenna will not get the KTIV signal.

ABC affiliate KCAU has graciously allowed KTIV to broadcast on one of their sub-channels, Channel 9.2. If you receive the LiveWell network on Channel 9.2, that's where KTIV's signal has been transferred.

The situation is complicated, and crews are out working around the clock on KTIV's transmission tower, scaling the side of the 2,000 foot tall transmission tower to try and fix the issue as quickly as possible.

However, those crews say that realistically, it may be days before KTIV's full broadcasting capability returns.

Friday morning around 4 a.m., a malfunction 1,600 feet off the ground in Northwest Iowa caused many KTIV viewers to lose the station's signal.

"This is fairly unusual. It's only happened at any of our stations probably once in the last 20 years, and it's very challenging when it does occur," Brady Dreasler, Director of Engineering for Quincy Broadcasting said.

KTIV's parent company, says a 'burnout' occurred on the 2,000 foot tall tower. Suddenly, only about seven-percent of KTIV's broadcasting power was available from the tower.

"It was no longer working. We investigated it further last (Friday) night, and we found out that it is very serious," Dreasler said.

Crews discovered that the burnout occurred on the transmission line at about 1,600 feet, causing damage all the way to the ground level.

That transmission line's piping begins indoors just north of Hinton, Iowa. It travels out to the tower, and all the way up to the 13 ton antenna at the top, which pushes KTIV's broadcast signal out to Siouxland's viewers.

With major damage to 1,600 feet of that 2,000 foot-long transmission line, crews shut down the tower completely to begin making repairs to try and quickly remedy the problem.

While crews are prepared to work around the clock, Dreasler says the damage is significant enough that it could take a good amount of time to completely repair the transmission line. 

"We did have a burnout at about 1,600 feet, which caused the transmission line to fail all the way down to ground level. That's what we're dealing with right now. It's a fairly serious situation that we will get repaired, but it's just going to take some time to get it done," Dreasler said.

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