PHOTOS AND VIDEO: 2017 solar eclipse coverage - KTIV News 4 Sioux City IA: News, Weather and Sports

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PHOTOS AND VIDEO: 2017 solar eclipse coverage

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Photo Courtesy: Scott Locati - Solar eclipse in Sioux City. Photo Courtesy: Scott Locati - Solar eclipse in Sioux City.
KTIV's Al Joens talks with Meteorologist Jaret Lansford who is Live from Ravenna, Nebraska. KTIV's Al Joens talks with Meteorologist Jaret Lansford who is Live from Ravenna, Nebraska.
View of the solar eclipse from Signal Hill in Sioux City. View of the solar eclipse from Signal Hill in Sioux City.
Students are lining up to see the eclipse through the telescope here at Wayne State College. Students are lining up to see the eclipse through the telescope here at Wayne State College.
Totality has been reached in Ravenna, Nebraska. #Eclipse2017 Totality has been reached in Ravenna, Nebraska. #Eclipse2017

Across the United States and here in Siouxland, eyes were turned toward the sky.

The solar eclipse started in Sioux City at 11:37 a.m. and the peak is at 1:02 p.m. and ended at 2:27 p.m.

It's being called the Great American Eclipse and it will be the most observed and photographed solar eclipse in history.

And we had almost a front-row seat here in Siouxland.

It wasn't a total eclipse, but pretty close: 95 percent coverage.  

It was the first total solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. coast to coast in nearly a century has come to an end in South Carolina.

Americans across the land watched in wonder Monday as the moon blocked the sun, turning daylight into twilight.
   
Totality -- when the sun is completely obscured by the moon -- lasted just two minutes or so in each location along the narrow corridor stretching all the way across the U.S., from Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. It took about 90 minutes for total blockage to cross the country.
   
Two-hundred million people live within a day's drive of Monday's path of totality. So towns and parks along the eclipse's main drag have welcomed monumental crowds. The last coast-to-coast eclipse was in 1918.

KTIV Meteorologist Jaret Lansford is in Ravenna, Nebraska. He said during totality, you could see a few stars. 

Jaret will be live from Ravenna for News 4 Live at 5 and 6. 


Previous story: 
NASA
says on Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun.

WATCH LIVE: NASA TV Public Channel

Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe-inspiring sights - a total solar eclipse.

This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina.

Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk. 


KTIV has crews across Siouxland. Follow @JaretKTIV4, @MichelleKTIV4, @TiffanyKTIV4 and @DanielleKTIV4 on Twitter and Facebook for reports throughout the day. 

For more solar eclipse coverage go herehttp://www.ktiv.com/category/325220/solar-eclipse

Eclipse safety information from NASA

Five tips from NASA for photographing the Total Solar Eclipse 

How to make a pinhole camera

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